Disabled Person-Led Monitoring of the UNCRPD

See More

What is Disabled Person-Led Monitoring Research?

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is an international agreement. It sets out what governments must do to make sure disabled people have the same rights as everybody else. You can read the Convention here.

In 2008, the Government of New Zealand signed the Convention, indicating its commitment to making disability rights real in Aotearoa New Zealand. More than a decade on, it is important to understand if, and how well, this is happening. Monitoring research is how we do this.

In 2018, the Donald Beasley Institute was appointed by the Disabled Persons Organisation Coalition (DPO Coalition) and the New Zealand Government as the research partner to carry out the monitoring research.

Over six years we will conduct inclusive and accessible research on behalf of the DPO Coalition that enables disabled people to share their experiences of human rights in Aotearoa New Zealand. We will also be monitoring the progressive realisation of the Convention at a systemic level. This means investigating systems and policies that have resulted in the violation of disabled people's rights.

In 2019, we began by interviewing disabled people and their families/whānau about their experiences of housing (2018 - 2020) and then health and wellbeing (2020-2021). These reports are expected to be launched in 2022. We have now started the planning for the next cycle of monitoring, where we are investigating disabled people's right to supports and services under the new Ministry for Disabled People.

It is important to know that this research is led entirely by disabled people. From the Project Lead and Research Assistant, to Monitors, transcribers, and participants, this project embodies the disability rights slogan 'nothing about us, without us' at every stage of the research process.

We will be using this webpage to publish updated information, including advertisements, calls to participate, research documents and forms, the final reports, as well as all of the content in accessible formats (audio, Easy Read, large print, New Zealand Sign Language and te Reo Māori).

Disabled Person-Led Monitoring Reports

The DBI, together with the DPO Coalition, are pleased to release three monitoring reports (2018 - 2022).

Long Report:

Short Report:

 Key Findings:

Image one: My Experiences, My Rights: A Monitoring Report on Disabled People’s Experiences of Health and Wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand Key Findings and Recommendations 1/20 Aotearoa New Zealand is a signatory of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD). This means the New Zealand Government has agreed to implement the Convention’s provisions, monitor progress, and report back to the Convention’s Committee on various issues affecting disabled people (Article 33). In 2018, the Donald Beasley Institute (DBI) was commissioned by the Disabled People’s Organisations (DPOs) Coalition to independently monitor the health and wellbeing experiences of disabled people in Aotearoa New Zealand.  My Experiences, My Rights: A Monitoring Report on Disabled People’s Experiences of Health and Wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand 2/20  Article 25 of UNCRPD recognises disabled people’s right to the highest attainable standard of health.  My Experiences, My Rights: A Monitoring Report on Disabled People’s Experiences of Health and Wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand 3/20 Key Finding 1:  Many disabled people experience financial, physical, mental, communication and sensory barriers when accessing affordable, high-quality healthcare and services.  My Experiences, My Rights: A Monitoring Report on Disabled People’s Experiences of Health and Wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand 4/20 Key Finding 2:  The health and disability support system is complex. It is often difficult for disabled people to navigate.  My Experiences, My Rights: A Monitoring Report on Disabled People’s Experiences of Health and Wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand 5/20 Key Finding 3:  Many disabled people have limited choice and control over the services, treatment and medication they receive.  My Experiences, My Rights: A Monitoring Report on Disabled People’s Experiences of Health and Wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand 6/20 Key Finding 4:  Some disabled people experience barriers when accessing public health programmes and sexual or reproductive health services.  My Experiences, My Rights: A Monitoring Report on Disabled People’s Experiences of Health and Wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand 7/20 Key Finding 5:  A lack of disability support and specialist care in rural areas has been detrimental to the health and wellbeing of disabled people.  My Experiences, My Rights: A Monitoring Report on Disabled People’s Experiences of Health and Wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand 8/20 Key Finding 6:  For many disabled people it is difficult to get an accurate diagnosis and treatment.  My Experiences, My Rights: A Monitoring Report on Disabled People’s Experiences of Health and Wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand 9/20 Key Finding 7:  Health and disability professionals often lack the disability training and awareness needed to provide disabled people with high-quality health care.  My Experiences, My Rights: A Monitoring Report on Disabled People’s Experiences of Health and Wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand 10/20 Key Finding 8:  The negative attitudes of health professionals towards disability can be a barrier to disabled people receiving high- quality health care.  My Experiences, My Rights: A Monitoring Report on Disabled People’s Experiences of Health and Wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand 11/20 Key Finding 9:  Many disabled people cannot access private health and life insurance because their disability is considered a pre-existing condition.  My Experiences, My Rights: A Monitoring Report on Disabled People’s Experiences of Health and Wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand 12/20 Key Finding 10:  Many disabled people covered by ACC (as a form of insurance) find it complex, inconsistent and overly focused on rehabilitation.  My Experiences, My Rights: A Monitoring Report on Disabled People’s Experiences of Health and Wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand 13/20 Key Finding 11:  A lot of disabled people are afraid of being denied healthcare due to prejudices held by health care professionals.  My Experiences, My Rights: A Monitoring Report on Disabled People’s Experiences of Health and Wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand 14/20 Recommendation 1:  The implementation of a more equitable health and disability support system that does not discriminate on the basis of disability.  My Experiences, My Rights: A Monitoring Report on Disabled People’s Experiences of Health and Wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand 15/20 Recommendation 2:  The implementation of a more holistic and equitable approach to disabled people’s healthcare, including free primary healthcare and dental care.   My Experiences, My Rights: A Monitoring Report on Disabled People’s Experiences of Health and Wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand 16/20 Recommendation 3:  The provision of equitable health and disability supports and services in regional and rural areas.  My Experiences, My Rights: A Monitoring Report on Disabled People’s Experiences of Health and Wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand 17/20 Recommendation 4:  Improved disability rights training and awareness within tertiary health programmes and ongoing professional development.  My Experiences, My Rights: A Monitoring Report on Disabled People’s Experiences of Health and Wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand 18/20 Recommendation 5:  Improve and introduce insurance-related legislation that prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability.  My Experiences, My Rights: A Monitoring Report on Disabled People’s Experiences of Health and Wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand 19/20 Recommendation 6:  Ensure all health-specific policy and legislation is developed using a rights-based framework according to the UNCRPD.  My Experiences, My Rights: A Monitoring Report on Disabled People’s Experiences of Health and Wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand 20/20

My Experiences, My Rights: Supports and Services (2022-2024)

In 2022 we will begin the third cycle of Disabled Person-Led Monitoring of the UNCRPD in Aotearoa New Zealand, investigating disabled people's right to supports and services under the new Ministry for Disabled People.

In Aotearoa New Zealand, the Government provides disabled people with supports and services that ensure their human rights can be realised in a full and meaningful way. But sometimes disabled people don’t receive the supports and services they need. And sometimes they miss out altogether.

In this cycle of monitoring we will be talking to disabled people with a range of different support and service experiences, as well as family, whānau, aiga and close supporters. We want to know what disabled people think and feel about existing supports and services, changes to the disability support system, the new Ministry for Disabled People and how these changes are meeting disabled people’s rights under the UNCRPD.

Stay tuned for more information on how to participate in the coming weeks.

Contact

Twitter: DBI_tweet

Project Lead
Dr Robbie Francis Watene
027 529 2114
rfrancis@donaldbeasley.org.nz

Junior Research Fellow
Umi Asaka
021 109 3218
uasaka@donaldbeasley.org.nz

 

Project Artwork by Eve McCoy 

 

< Back To Projects

Interested in participating in this project or one of our other projects?

Copyright © Donald Beasley. All rights reserved. | Privacy Policy

Back to top