Announcements

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Disability Strategy and Action Plan: Rautaki Hauātanga me te Mahere Mahi launched

30th July 2021


We are excited to announce that a Disability Strategy and Action Plan: Rautaki Hauātanga me te Mahere Mahi was launched the by Southern District Health Board (SDHB) in May 2021 . The Donald Beasley Institute was commissioned by the SDHB to facilitate the development of the Strategy in consultation with disabled people, tāngata whaikaha, Deaf people, whānau and the wider community. You can access the Strategy from here: (PDF) https://www.southernhealth.nz/sites/default/files/2021-03/FINAL%20WEB%20Disability%20Strategy%202021.pdf

(Easy Read) https://www.southernhealth.nz/sites/default/files/2021-01/SDHB%20Disability%20Strategy%20-%20Easy%20Read%20-%20final%2019-1-2021.pdf 

 

Reimagining Parenting Update

11th January 2021

The DBI would like to talk to parents with a learning disability who have their children living with them. We are also interested to hear from parents who have children living in foster or whānau care. Please contact us if you are a parent with a learning disability, and think you might like to take part in the research.

You can contact us by email at bmirfin-veitch@donaldbeasley.org.nz, on our freephone number 0800 878 839, or by using this form

More information on the Reimagining Parenting project.

UNCRPD Monitoring Update

11th January 2021

A huge thank you to everyone who contributed to the second cycle of monitoring on disabled people's access to health and wellbeing in Aotearoa New Zealand - a fitting topic for the current global health crisis! We are still looking for a small number of people to interview, and invite potential participants to register their interest through the Monitoring webpage.

Stay tuned for more information on how you can get involved in the DBI's Disabled Person-Led Monitoring of the UNCRPD Project.

Mean As!: Stories of relationship, intimacy and sexuality told by people with learning disability

20 March 2020

We are excited to launch the Mean As! Project. People with learning disabilities have their own stories of relationships and sexuality to tell, but often don’t get the chance to tell them. In this “Mean As! Project eight adults with a learning disability had the opportunity to “speak back” to the way society has been taught to read their lives, by telling their own stories in their own way. These stories were shared with four researchers with learning disabilities, who were also given space to develop their own ways of listening, interpreting and responding to what they heard. To learn more about Mean As!, head to Projects.

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